Interactive Writing Book Study Ch 3 to 5

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Interactive Writing Book Study Ch 3 - 5

Interactive Writing Book Study Ch 3 – 5

July 9 Deedee 3 min read

Interactive Writing Book Study Ch 3 to 5! Let's look at the book Interactive Writing Across the Grades as part of our blog book study. See how to engage young writers through explicit writing instruction.

Interactive Writing Book Study Ch 3 to 5 is what we are going to talk about today.  Welcome back!  If you want to catch up Chapters 1 and 2, you can click HERE to read them.  I got this book from Amazon and you can order it by clicking HERE. (affilaite link)

Interactive Writing Chapter 3:  Experience

The authors start out with a quote from K. Bromley, “Writers write about what they know.”   The authors go on to challenge us to provide interactive writing opportunities that “select, capture, and record the meaningful events that students experience each day at school.” p. 30

There is a fantastic table on p. 31 that provides ideas on how to incorporate interactive writing across the curriculum and school day.

Interactive Writing Book Study Ch 3 to 5! Let's look at the book Interactive Writing Across the Grades as part of our blog book study. See how to engage young writers through explicit writing instruction.

Naturally, my eye zoomed into the idea that the read aloud books we use every day is a perfect place to embed this type of instruction.  As you know, we advocate interactive writing each day as part of our interactive read aloud experience.  You can read more on this by clicking HERE.

Interactive Writing Book Study Ch 3 to 5! Let's look at the book Interactive Writing Across the Grades as part of our blog book study. See how to engage young writers through explicit writing instruction.

Interactive Writing Chapter 4:  Prewrite

The prewriting part of the lesson centers around student discussion.   It is at this time you discuss the purpose and audience for your piece.  The authors tell us that in kindergarten, the teacher makes many of these decisions since the students do not have as much experience with these concepts.

On p. 46 the authors discuss the steps teachers should consider in their prewrite planning:

  • Student’s strengths and needs
  • School or district writing expectations
  • Real-world writing purposes

Then as you plan you should ask yourself a few questions:

  • What type of writing will you do? (lists, letters, descriptive…)
  • Why are you writing this? What is the purpose for writing this piece?
  • Who is your audience? (peers, parents, others in the community…)

The authors also have a helpful table on page 56 that offers some tool suggestions.  One of the tools mentioned is anchor charts.

Here is a VERY OLD anchor chart I did with my class on nonfiction writing.  You can read more on this by reading THIS blog post.

Interactive Writing Book Study Ch 3 to 5! Let's look at the book Interactive Writing Across the Grades as part of our blog book study. See how to engage young writers through explicit writing instruction.

The table on page 45 offers helpful suggestions for connecting student experiences to multiple types of writing.

Interactive Writing Chapter 5: Composing

With interactive writing, you are composing a piece of text one sentence at a time.

Interactive Writing Book Study Ch 3 to 5! Let's look at the book Interactive Writing Across the Grades as part of our blog book study. See how to engage young writers through explicit writing instruction.

The authors go into specific ideas for lesson sequence on pages 65-66.

On page 67, the authors state,  “The ultimate goal of interactive writing lesson is to improve students’ independent writing.”  So they reiterate the need to specifically transfer the interactive lesson big ideas to the students’ independent writing.  For example, you might say, “Today in our lesson we worked on rereading our previous sentence to make sure our next sentence will make sense and we don’t leave anything out.  You should also practice this when you are writing on your own during writers workshop.”

I also love the table on p 76 that gives some suggestions for teaching craft during your interactive writing lesson.

Interactive Writing Book Study Ch 3 to 5! Let's look at the book Interactive Writing Across the Grades as part of our blog book study. See how to engage young writers through explicit writing instruction.

One of my challenges in this book study is to not include EVERY TABLE this book has, because I don’t want to infringe on the authors’ intellectual property.  BUT I must say, this book is FILLED with so many practical and grade specific suggestions.  Although I am looking at it through the eyes of an early childhood education, it has just as many educational gems for grades 3-5. I highly recommend it!  This would make an excellent school-wide book study!

Join me next week as we continue this book study!

Interactive Writing Book Study Ch 3 to 5! Let's look at the book Interactive Writing Across the Grades as part of our blog book study. See how to engage young writers through explicit writing instruction

 

I know some of you are still waiting on your books.   When you get a chance, I would love to hear your reflections on this book!  Simply comment on this post.  If you have a blog where you added your discussion, please include a link to that post.  

Catch up on this book study!

If you are just getting started on this book study… no fear.  You can catch up on all of the chapters by clicking on the links below

You can find this book on Amazon by clicking HERE. (affiliate)

Interactive Writing Book Study Chapters 1 & 2

Interactive Writing Book Study Chapters 3 to 5

Interactive Writing Book Study Chapters 6 to 8

Interactive Writing Book Study Chapters 9 & 10

 

9 Comments

  • Lauren Dance July 10 at 4:17 am

    I am really enjoying this book! I am going to be at a new school this year that uses a canned curriculum for reading so I am going to have my work cut out for me in doing close reading with the texts and now trying to figure out how to add in interactive writing to reflect on each book. I think the children will really enjoy interacting with each other and the text as part of their learning!

  • Melanie July 13 at 7:16 pm

    Hi, Deedee!

    I always love your summer book studies and I’m thrilled this one is about writing! Although I am a middle school teacher, I get such great ideas from all of you fantastic primary teachers because good teaching is good teaching…it doesn’t have an age limit! ๐Ÿ™‚

    The first time I ever saw interactive writing being modeled wasn’t in any college class but rather in my son’s first grade classroom. It was the last year of my stay-at-home mom stint, and I had asked my son’s teacher if she could use any help. I figured it was a good way to get my feet wet before I went back to teaching full time again, but boy, it was the best educational experience of my life!

    Every morning, I would go and check in each student’s take-home readers while Mrs. D taught writing. I can still see her sitting on her tiny chair next to the overhead projector (did I just give my age away? Ha) while she and the class created the day’s journal entry. She modeled spaghetti spaces between letters and meatball spaces between words. Students would eagerly raise their hands to offer suggestions and revision ideas. They proposed using techniques that one of their favorite authors used in a book. I was amazed–those kids LOVED writing!

    As a middle school teacher, I had only really been taught what to write on students’ papers AFTER they finished writing…and that instruction had been pretty hit and miss. Wow! Imagine actually demonstrating HOW to construct sentences, paragraphs, and essays! It seems silly, but be honest–how many of us adults were actually shown how to do this in a methodical step-by-step way? Not this girl!

    So fast forward to today. I have successfully used Mrs. D’s technique with students ranging from 6th grade to freshmen in high school. I usually start the lesson by introducing the writing topic we are going to study that week, such as word choice. We read a quick picture book (which they LOVE) like BRAVE IRENE and the kids find exemplary words in the text. The next time we meet we pull sentences from the text and expand them or substitute more precise words. On Wednesday, I will bring in a sample of something I wrote and use the document camera or I’ll use my projector and display the word document. Trust me, they thoroughly enjoy critiquing my writing (ha!), but it gives them real, painless experience with revision and editing. Usually on Thursday, I’ll sit at my computer, open a word document, turn on the projector, and we will create a mini writing together. This is usually the a-ha! moment where they see how everything ties together. On Friday, they are on their own to show what they’ve learned over the week and to show off a bit. ๐Ÿ™‚

    All this to say, everything I really needed to know about teaching I learned from kindergarten and first grade teachers. ๐Ÿ™‚ I am so excited to get more ideas to implement into my classroom! Thank you for the important work you do!!!

    P.S. Sorry, I didn’t mean to write a book!

    • Sandi July 15 at 7:04 am

      Thanks for sharing, Melanie. My focus has always been early childhood and it’s interesting for me to see how interactive writing can be used in higher grades.

    • Deedee July 17 at 8:37 pm

      Thank you! Thank you! Your response was spot on and I loved it!

  • Sandi July 14 at 11:04 am

    Just got notification from Amazon that my book has shipped! Should be here Monday and then I can catch up. Anyone else waiting for their book?

  • Sandi July 19 at 6:35 am

    EXPERIENCE:
    Being able to write about a shared experience is powerful. Kids are writing about a real event that they participated in. Every child can have something valid to say. I believe it empowers young writers.

    PREWRITE:
    I love that this planning is done whole group in that “safe environment”. Getting my kids to understand that writers think and plan before they begin to write has continued to be a challenge for me. Regardless of how many mini-lessons and how much modeling I’ve done, I still will have several students get to their writing area and just grab a pencil/crayon and start writing/drawing. I realize this is normal, but I think experiencing this planning in consistent whole group interactive writing opportunities will be an added teaching time that will have big results. They will be able to own this planning, they won’t just be sitting listening and watching me.

    COMPOSE:
    This is probably the part of interactive writing that excites me the most as far as its potential to support young writers. I have my students do a lot of oral storytelling, especially at the beginning of the year. I want them to understand that everyone has a story to tell, etc. I’m always amazed at how they grow in this ability as the days progress. They tell detailed stories with great feeling and timing. They use interesting words. They are connecting with their listeners. Then when they try to put these stories on paper, UGH!! The mechanics of getting those letters and words down on paper sucks the energy and joy right out of them and soon their sentences are 4-6 word shadows of what they were able to share orally. I have to say I have a continuing internal struggle with Writing Workshop because of this and wonder if we get the cart before the horse. I love Katie Wood Ray’s book “In Pictures and In Words” for this reason. Anyway, I’ve gotten off the subject and please know that I love Writing Workshop for a multitude of other reasons and recognize and support the need for students to do independent writing.
    The compose part of interactive writing provides a separate teaching time to nurture those craft elements of writing. We can have fun with words, talk about voice, use conventions as a natural part of the writing piece.

    Thoughts?

  • Mary Ann Mowery February 1 at 11:40 am

    I am looking for the parent letter called Author at Work to share with my kindergarten friends. Do you happen to know where I could find a copy of this letter?
    Mary Annn

    • Deedee February 2 at 5:43 am

      Hi there! Yes! You will find those letters in each of our Writers Workshop curriculum units. Here is a link to find them:

      Writing Through the Year

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    My teaching career allowed me to experience teaching to different age groups and in different classroom environments. My heart belongs to early childhood education and I love working with other teachers who share this same love as me. Read More

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